Clinical Experience

For phase 1 students, interactions will consist of restraining well-behaved animals for procedures, while spending most of their time learning through observation. Phase 1 students will learn from questions such as:

  • How did the staff handle the patient?
  • What procedures were performed and why?
  • What tests were performed and why?

For phase 2 students, an increased medical knowledge will allow them to formulate problem lists and differential diagnoses, as well as assessing and triaging patients. Phase 2 students will learn from questions such as:

  • Why were certain tests ordered?
  • What anaesthetic protocols were used?
  • How was infection prevented during procedures?

In phase 3, students will work on formulating diagnostic and treatment plans, as well as prescribing drugs and tests. Phase 3 students will learn from questions such as:

  • How can I educate clients during appointments?
  • What surgical technique was used and what are its advantages and disadvantages?
  • What anaesthetic protocol was used and what are its advantages and disadvantages?

Students who are in phase 4 are able to practice performing during real appointments with the assistance and guidance of a veterinarian to experience exactly how primary care facilities will function. Phase 4 students are responsible for all parts of appointments which they are given, right up to and including follow-up calls and check-ins on clients. It is important that our graduating students obtain as much real life, everyday experience as possible so that they are prepared to enter their own careers upon graduation.